Archive for the ‘Police Procedure’ Category

PostHeaderIcon Investigator G. Nome’s Guide to Developing Fingerprints


Confused as to which fingerprinting medium is right for the task at hand? Well, Investigator G. Nome has assembled the ultimate guide for the heroes of your tall tales, and keeping it within easy reach, heroes such as Bosch, D.D. Warren, Will Trent, or any of their peers, will never again fret over such details.

Investigator G, Nome’s Guide to Developing Fingerprints

Before attempting to lift a print from any surface, the savvy investigator will first determine the type of surface to be printed. In addition to surface type and texture (porous, nonporous, etc.), other factors must be considered, such as the presence of foreign matters—dust, dirt, perspiration, blood, oils, grease, and moisture, to name a few.

Lighting is important, including the use of alternate light sources and lasers. The latter two can cause the perspiration and oils in found in some prints to fluoresce, making them easy to see without further developing.

Once investigators have determined the surface type and whether or not obstacles exist (foreign matter) it’s time to select the proper method and materials needed to properly develop the desired prints(s).

Surface Types

As always, the first order of business is to try and see the prints using only the naked eye. Sometimes they’re quite obvious.

Porous Surfaces - first attempt the above. If no prints are obvious, then try fluorescence by laser or alternate light source. If that doesn’t quite work, then it’s time to bring out the big guns, such as…

1. Iodine fuming

2. Ninhydrin

3. DFO (1,8-Diazafluoren-9-one)


Non-Porous Surfaces - first try to see with the naked eye. If no prints are obvious, then try fluorescence by laser or alternate light source. If those steps do not produce results, then use the following to develop invisible prints.

1. Cyanoacrylate fuming (SuperGlue)

2. Cyanoacrylate dye

3. Vacuum metal deposition (VMD)

4. Powder


Still not satisfied with your options? Okay, let’s roll in the specialists…


Bloodstained Specimens—Porous Surfaces

1. DFO (1,8-Diazafluoren-9-one)

2. Ninhydrin

3. Powder – amido black

Bloodstained Specimens—Nonporous Surfaces

1. leucocrystal violet (LCV) or amido black

2. Cyanoacrylate fuming (SuperGlue)

3. Cyanoacrylate dye

4. Vacuum metal deposition (VMD)


1. DFO (1,8-Diazafluoren-9-one)

2. Ninhydrin

3. Silver Nitrate

Rubber Gloves—Semiporous

1. Iodine spray reagent

2. Cyanoacrylate fuming

3. Laser or alternate light source

4. Magnetic powder

5. Cyanoacrylate dye

6. Laser or alternate light source

7. Ninhydrin

Tape—Non-adhesive Side

1. Cyanoacrylate fuming

2. Cyanoacrylate dye

3. Vacuum metal deposition (VMD)

4. Powder

Tape—Adhesive Side

1. Sticky-side powder

2. Alternate black powder

3. Ash gray powder

4. Gentian violet

Dark-colored adhesive side of tape

1. Ash gray powder

2. Liqui-Drox

3. Gentian violet

* Should the investigator decide to use Cyanoacrylate fuming, it must be done on the nonadhesive side of tape first, then both sides can be processed with Liqui-Drox.

Photographs—Emulsion Side

1. Iodine spray reagent

2. Cyanoacrylate fuming

3. Cyanoacrylate dye

4. Vacuum metal deposition (VMD)

5. Powder

Photographs—Paper Side—Semiporous

1. Cyanoacrylate fuming

2. Magnetic powder

3. DFO (1,8-Diazafluoren-9-one)

4. Ninhydrin

5. Cyanoacrylate dye


Powder and Other Developer Uses

1. Alternate Black – sticky sides of labels and other tapes.

2. Gentian Violet – adhesive side of various tapes.

3. Sticky-side powder – Duh… This one’s for use on sticky sides of tape.

4. Amido Black (methanol or water based) – prints pressed into bloody surfaces. *water based includes a blood fixative.

5. Cyanoacrylate fuming (SuperGlue) – nonporous surfaces.

6. Cyanoacrylate Florescent Dye – used to enhance prints on non-porous surfaces. Best viewed using alternate light sources.

7. DAB (Diaminobenzidine) – developing prints found in blood. Also useful in this situation are Coomassie Brilliant Blue and Crowle’s Double Stain.

8. DFO (1,8-Diazafluoren-9-One) – porous surfaces; reacts with amino acids in perspiration

*Heating a fingerprint to 40 degrees Celcius forces amino acids to separate from a fingerprint. Add a special chemical to the sample and, with a 99% accuracy, the concentration indicates if the fingerprint belongs to either a male or female. Why? Because females have a different concentration of amino acids than males.

9. Iodine Fuming – porous surfaces containing grease or oils; turns yellowish color/stain

10. Ninhydrin – another product used on porous surfaces. Reacts with amino acids in perspiration.

11. Physical Developer – works on both porous and non-porous surfaces and is especially effective on paper currency.

12. Silver Nitrate – porous surfaces, especially paper. Stains caused by presence of Silver Nitrate cannot be removed. Also, prints developed by Silver Nitrate will totally disappear within a few hours, therefore it is imperative to photograph the prints as soon as they’re visible.

13. Sudan Black – a dye that stains sebaceous perspiration on surfaces contaminated by food items of greasy and oily varieties.

14. Vacuum Metal Deposition – non-porous or semi-porous, such as photographs and magazine pages. Use of VMD causes printed material to become extremely fragile.

15. Liqui-Drox – a fluorescent dye used to develop prints on the adhesive and non-adhesive sides of dark-colored tape.

16. MBD (Fluorescent Dye) – used on various colored surfaces.

17. Safranin O (a florescent dye) – used to enhance prints developed by Cyanoacrylate fuming (SuperGlue). Thenoyl Europium Chelate (Fluorescent Dye) is used to stain those prints. This dye can only be viewed under UV light.


PostHeaderIcon For the Difficult-to-Buy-for CSI in Your Stories


1. Blue Wonder – touch-up kit used to repair or hide scratches in the finish of most firearms. Perfect for use prior to attending holiday parties when wearing a dinged-up firearm on your side simply won’t do. $29.95

2. Blue Wonder Removal System – used to remove finishes from firearms—parkerized, cold blue or hot blue. Available in two small squirt bottles, one for removing the finish and the other for preparing the weapon for refinishing. $19.95

3. Scarab Cutterhandheld device used for cutting zip-ties and other temporary/disposable restraints. $28.95

4. MicroBurst Fuming Wand Kit by EVIDENT – used in the field to quickly process items (fingerprints) with cyanoacrylate (Super Glue). $139.95

5. Blood Spatter Kit 2015 – perfect for use in the field when analyzing blood spatter trajectory. Comes complete with tools needed, including multiple spools of assorted brightly colored strings. Again, from EVIDENT.


6. Forensic Entomology Kit – everything you need for collecting bugs in, on, around, and beneath a decomposing corpse. $275.00

7. Forensic Archaeology Kit – a perfect gift for the grave robber who has everything. Also comes in handy for CSI’s who’ve uncovered a clandestine grave. $789.00

8. Blood Impression Kit – used for locating and preserving bloody impressions. (No, not the cheeky imitations of celebrities by British comics). $369.00

9. Explosive Test Kits – for the detective of explosives. Able to pinpoint a variety of exotic flavors—nitro, ammonium, urea nitrate, chlorates, phosphates, and more! $69.00 per kit

10. Blood Spatter Training Blood – comes in handy when the real thing is simply not available. $24.00 per 8 oz. bottle

And, when realistic training is a must, try Spatter Head. Warning, this video is kind of graphic and may be offensive, but only if the bashing-in of a fake skull is upsetting to you. However, you will quickly understand the force it takes to…well, let’s just say killing someone requires more than a blow to the head with a copy of your favorite author’s latest book.

Hot New Release!
Hot New Release!
Visit This Blog!
Hot New Release!
Hot New Release!
Hot New Release!
Buy This Book!
Web Hosts