Protecting Your Home Against Zipper Attacks

Motion_detector

Motion sensitive devices have been around for quite awhile, and they sometimes go above and beyond what we want them to do. For example, they light our driveways when our friendly neighbor’s flag flutters. They set off our home alarm system after the burglar who broke a window to gain entry is already twenty feet inside the living room. And they turn off public restroom lights in mid stream (pun intended) if they no longer detect movement.

But, in spite of their quirks motion detectors are handy devices. It’s their sensitivity settings, or lack thereof, that can drive an owner to the point of grabbing a baseball bat to knock the thing from its mounting in order to club it into a million pieces. The nerve of it to flash on and off all night long causing us to think an army of creepy crooked criminals are crawling across our concrete walks. Yes, feral cats think it’s funny to disturb your evening by darting back and forth across your driveway simply to watch you come running outside in your pajamas holding an umbrella or spatula as a weapon to use against the intruder your winky-blinky light told you was there.

So, knowing the current issues and flaws associated with these flawed fixtures, scientists have developed a super-smart motion detector that not only works well and is extremely sensitive, it is 100% concealable. And speaking of its sensitivity, well, it can detect a movement as slight as someone moving the zipper on their jacket. You know, like when the bad guys in old films give their coat zippers a tiny tug upward before committing a dastardly deed. So yes, the new motion sensor, a sensor cable, will fit nicely in crime novels and other fictional settings. Here’s how it works…

The cable is fitted with ultra-sensitive magnetic sensors that detect changes in magnetic fields…even minute changes in those fields, such as the slight vibration caused by the movement of the aforementioned zipper. When the cable detects these changes in the nearby magnetic field it sends a message via Bluetooth to a controller that can activate outdoor lights, alarms, video recorders, call the police, alert a home or business owner, etc.

The sensor cable can be mounted along a fence line, hung in trees, and even buried underground.

This new device sounds wonderful and foolproof. However, it is still a cousin to the Internet of Things family, which means that no matter how seriously sensitive the sensor’s sensors are, its controller is susceptible to super-sorry hackers.

Still, imagine an entry team ready to serve a high-risk warrant at a home with one of these cables buried around the perimeter of the property when one of the team members discovers that he’d forgotten to zip his fly at the last bathroom break. Should he zip up, risking alerting those inside the target home to the team’s presence? Or, should he move in as planned, hoping there are no “escapes from custody.” Either way, the result would not be pretty.

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20 Survival Tips for Real and Fictional Officers

Firearms Training

Cops absorb lots of information during the months they spend in the training academy. Then, when they finally do hit the streets they’re required to ride with a field training officer for a few months, a time when the FTO crams even more important stuff into their brains.

Over and over again, academy trainers and field training officers drill information and practical skills into the minds of recruits. Over and over and over again. And, among all the laws, facts, figures, running, pushups, sit-ups, shooting drills, defensive tactics, and on-the-job training, a common theme emerges—officer survival. And survival skills have never been more important than they are today.

Here are a few tips taught to police officers that can help keep them safe and bring them home at the end of the day.

1. Remember these three words. You will survive! Never give up no matter how many times you’ve been shot, stabbed, or battered.

2. Carry a good weapon. You can’t win a gun fight if your weapon won’t fire.

3. Carry plenty of ammunition. There’s no such thing as having too many bullets.

4. Treat every single situation as a potential ambush. This includes during meals, at movies, ball games, and church, etc. You never know when it could happen. This is why cops don’t like to sit with their backs to a door. Please don’t ask them to do so.

5. Practice your shooting skills in every possible situation—at night, lying down, with your weak hand, etc.

6, Wear your seat belt.

7. Wear your body armor.

8. Always expect the unexpected.

9. Suspect everyone until you’re absolutely sure they’re okay and pose no threat to you.

10. Trust no one until trust is earned. Even then, be cautious.

11. Everyone is a potential threat until it’s proven they’re not. Remember, bad people can have pretty faces and warm smiles and say nice things. But all that can change in the blink of an eye.

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12. Know when to retreat.

13. Stay in shape! Eat healthy. Exercise.

14. Train, train, and train.

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15. Take advantage of specialized training classes and workshops outside of the department police academy. For example, the blackbelt trainers at your local gym just might be police academy or military instructors who could address your concerns and weaknesses, and/or enhance your strengths. For example, some of the specialized training I’ve taught include standing, prone, and ground combat, knife and stick fighting, defending the sudden attack, and personal and executive bodyguard training.

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16. Use common sense and remember your training, because your family needs you safely at home at the end of your shift.

17. Family first. Job second.

18. Make no judgements based on a person’s lifestyle, personality, race, or religion. Treat everyone fairly and equally, from the homeless drug addict to the crooked Wall Street embezzler. However, remain on alert and cautious at all times.

19. Talk to people. Get to know them. Let them get to know you. After all, it’s often a bit tougher to hurt an officer they know and trust.

20. Find a release for your stress. Bike/exercise. Vacation. Talk to someone. Read. Write. Spiritual guidance. Hobbies.

Seek help the moment you notice a change/decrease in your work performance, increase in anxiety, excess use of alcohol and/or you consider drug use, change in sleep habits, you experience suicidal thoughts, or other drastic changes in your normal behavior.

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5 To Drive: A Life-Saving Conversation with Your Teen

accident

Vehicle crashes, not guns, knives, overdose, or physical abuse, are the leading cause of death among 14-18-year-olds in the U.S. Did you know that nearly half of all teen drivers involved in car crashes die?

Have you taken the time to talk to your teen about the dangers of driving? How about the 5 to Drive rules?

1. No cell phones.

2. No extra passengers.

3. No speeding.

4. No alcohol.

5. Always buckle up.

You say you have not discussed the 5 to Drive Rules with your teen driver? Well it’s time you did…please. And here’s how to begin.

In 2013…

 

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There, see how easy it was to have the conversation?

* Above data and infographics from the National Sheriff’s Association and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration/Traffic Safety Marketing.
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Intimate Partner Homicide: He Would Never Really Do It…Right?

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Intimate partner homicide is the 7th leading cause of premature death for women in the United States. It’s the number one cause of premature death among African American women between the ages of 15-45. Are those numbers not scary enough? How about this: Of all the women murdered in this country each year, half of them are killed by their intimate partners. And those figures do not include ex-boyfriends.

Is there a means to prevent these deaths? Should a woman be able to see this coming? Are there indicators that her partner is approaching the point of no return? Well, possibly.

Several risk factors have been associated with the murders of  battered women. However, many of the women who were killed by their domestic partner never realized the severity of the abuse. Sure, they knew they’d been beaten, had bones broken, etc., but they never actually thought they’d be killed. They suffered from the, “He’d never really do it because I know he loves me…” syndrome. And that’s not a bad thing, wanting to believe the best in your partner. But denying a problem is harmful, especially when it comes to abuse.

So what are some of the indicators that a partner’s violence may be escalating to the point of no return?

Studies have found a direct correlation between gun ownership and intimate partner homicide. In fact, women who are threatened with a gun are more likely than other women to be murdered—20 times more likely. Just the mere presence of a gun in the house causes an abused woman’s chance of being murdered to be 6 times higher than a woman living in a gun-free home.

Other risk factors include:

– Serious alcohol and drug abuse, where the abuser is high or drunk on a daily basis.

– Threats to kill

– Choking

– Jealousy

– Forced sex

– Partner controls all activity (when to leave the house, etc.)

– Woman is beaten while pregnant

– Partner beats the children

– Partner is violent outside the home as well

– Partner has threatened suicide

– Abused victim has thoughts that her partner will attempt to kill her at some point during their relationship

– Abused victim has thoughts of suicide to escape the violence

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Photo credit – FBI

Has your partner ever done or caused any of these things? If so, you are at risk. Please seek help immediately.

– Slapping, pushing—no injuries and/or lasting pain

– Punching, kicking—bruises, cuts, and/or continuing pain

– “Beating up”—severe contusions, burns, broken bones

– Threat to use weapon—head injury, internal injury, permanent injury

– Use of weapon—wounds from weapon

Ask yourself the following questions. If your answer to any of the questions is yes, you are at risk. Please seek help immediately. Do not wait!

– Has the physical violence increased in frequency over the past year?

– Does he ever try to choke you?

– Does he keep a gun in the house? In his vehicle?

– Has he ever forced you to have sex?

– Does he use drugs? Any drugs?

– Does he threaten to kill you?

– Is he drunk every every day?

– Does he control most or all of your daily activities, like who you can be friends with, how much money you can have, or when you can take the car, when can use the phone, etc.) Does he always have to be with you when you visit family, or go shopping? Does he tell what clothing you can and cannot wear?

– Have you ever been beaten by him while you were pregnant?

– Is he extremely jealous?

– Have you ever threatened or tried to commit suicide?

– Has he ever threatened or tried to commit suicide?

– Is he violent toward your children?

– Is he violent outside of the home? Does he fight with others?

Laci Peterson – murdered by her husband, Scott.

In 2008, 14% of all homicides were committed by intimate partners (70% of the victims were female).

Scott Peterson is currently awaiting his appointment with San Quentin’s executioner. He was sentenced to death for murdering his wife and unborn child, and tossing them in the San Francisco Bay on Christmas Eve of 2002. It is believed that Peterson fabricated homemade anchors from blocks of concrete and them fastened them to Laci’s body, hoping she’d remain on the bottom of the sea, forever.

Now, Peterson spends his days playing basketball and cards with other murderers. Oh, perhaps I should mention all the letters and money he receives from female admirers from all over the world. He deposits the cash into his inmate account, spending up to $180 per month on frilly things, like soda, cookies, and deodorant.

*NIJ statistics

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