The Road To Southern Paradise

The world is in turmoil. War, politics, soaring gas and food prices, and devastating weather continue to consume the headlines and our minds. So I invite you to take a moment to relax. Daydream a bit. Visit places where the only hustle-bustle you’ll see are the thousands of fiddler crabs darting across the marsh mud. Or go to the beach and watch the pelicans glide gracefully overhead. Listen to the waves hit the sand, leaving behind sizzling sea foam and the occasional piece of odd-shaped driftwood.

But where can you go to see both the marsh and the beach? Well, hop in the car. Let’s take a drive out to Tybee Island, Ga. It’s one of the closest places to paradise this side of…well, paradise.

 

 

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Friday’s Heroes: Remembering The Fallen

The Graveyard Shift extends our condolences to the families of these brave officers.

Officer J. Christopher Kilcullen

Eugene Oregon Police Department

April 22, 2011 – After a high-speed pursuit, Officer Kilcullen was shot and killed by the female driver as he approached her car. The woman originally fled because Officer Kilcullen had attempted to stop her for running a red light. He is survived by his wife and two children.

Deputy Sheriff Clifton Taylor, 31

Johnson County Texas Sheriff’s Office

April 23, 2011 – Deputy Clifton Taylor was shot and killed after responding to a domestic disturbance. Upon arrival, police began a search of the property, attempting to locate the male suspect. Deputy Taylor was shot when he opened the door to a storage shed. He is survived by his fiancee, parents, and siblings.

Officer Daryl Hall, 34

St. Louis Missouri Police Department

April 24, 2011 – Officer Daryl Hall was shot three times during an exchange of gunfire with two men outside a nightclub. He was transported to the hospital where he succumbed to his wounds. One of the suspects also died from gunshot wounds.

 

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Ten Excuses That Make Cops Say, “Hmm….”

Any cop will tell you that just when they think they’ve heard it all, well, along comes another excuse that tops all the rest. Here are ten reasons why people say they did what they did. All I can say is, “Hmm…

1.”Why am I driving naked, Officer? Well…all my clothes are dirty so I was going to my friend’s house to borrow something to wear to work. And I was speeding because it’s cold and the heat’s not working. Oh, yeah, no seat belt? You noticed that, huh? You see, the material causes my skin to break out… Why do I have a gun on the seat? Isn’t that obvious, sir? I don’t have any pockets available at the moment. Duh…I thought you guys were supposed to be trained observers.”

2. Please don’t give me a ticket. I didn’t slow down for the red light because I just got new brakes on my car—they were expensive, too—and I didn’t want to wear them out already. Geez, you being a cop and all, I thought you’d understand that sort of thing. Don’t they teach you about this stuff in the police academy? Common sense. That’s all I’m asking for here.”

3. “I had to steal that stuff, Officer. How else was I going to get enough money to pay my court fees and child support? I certainly didn’t want to go to jail.”

4. “Because I had to go to the bathroom. That’s why I was driving 95 in a 55. You don’t believe me, then look.” The wet spot on her jeans didn’t stop her from getting a ticket, but it did prevent the officer from asking her to have a seat in his car while he wrote it.

5. “I threw a football and it landed on the roof of that store, Officer. Honest. And when I climbed up there to get it I fell through that hole you see. The bag of burglary tools and that saw? I guess they were already up there. Must’ve fallen through when I did.”

6. “It’s not my car. That’s why I was driving so fast. The pedals are different, or something.”

7. “What? No way! I didn’t think you could give me a speeding ticket because I don’t have a driver’s license.”

8. “I must’ve fallen asleep inside the store just before they closed. The safe? No, I wasn’t trying to steal it. The door was locked and I couldn’t leave, so I used it to break out. See, I’m claustrophobic. No way I could stay in that place all night. The money. That’s mine. I had it when I went in the store. Yep, all $2,000. Every penny of it. No, I’m between jobs right now.  No, I don’t have an address. Well, not exactly. Yeah, the Union Mission over on 123rd. But only until I get a place of my own.”

9. “Yes, I have a doctor’s note, just not with me. Right, it authorizes me to NOT wear a seat belt because it pinches the skin around my nipple rings.” No, he didn’t have the doctor’s note and yes, he got the ticket.

10. “I was driving that fast, Officer, because I’d had WAY too much to drink and I wanted to get home before I got sick. You wouldn’t want to puke in your car, right?”

And that’s only ten…

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The Morgue: A Pictorial Journey

Jodi found the body lying beside the path, her favorite jogging trail. She stopped for a closer look, thinking that maybe her mind was up to its usual nighttime tricks—another boogeyman or zombie that turned out to be a bush, or a trash bag filled with leaves left by the park’s “mow, blow, and go” guys. After all, there was no moon, and the closest streetlight was awfully far away. And the shadows, well, they were long, and pretty dark. But this bush had…yes, those are arms and legs and…a head! It was a man. A dead man. Blood. There was so much of it. A knife on the ground. Don’t touch it. Run! Run and then call 911. Yes, 911.

She stood there talking to the detective, but her mind was now focusing on the coroner and his investigators as they loaded the body into the back of the van, shoving it inside as if it were no more than a roll of new carpet. They closed the rear doors, and the one who looked like a stump with arms and legs climbed into the driver’s seat. The brake lights flashed for a second, painting the pavement behind the van a faint red. Then it was gone, leaving a trail of wispy steam in its wake. She wondered what would happen next. I mean, what do they do with murder victims? Where do they take the bodies?

*Warning. Images below are graphic and may not be suitable for some readers and/or children. Please exit if images of death upset or offend you. We’ve posted this this particular piece solely to assist writers with their research.

The body is weighed, sometimes by rolling the gurney onto a set of digital floor scales.

Bodies are placed inside a cold room, or cooler until autopsy.

The body is brought into the autopsy room.

The gurney carrying the body is positioned in front of a station such as this one.

Side view of same station.

Scales for weighing organs.

A pathologist’s tool kit.

Bone saw.

Suturing the rear scalp after examining the brain.

The “Y” incision is closed post autopsy, and the body is released to a funeral home. (Top left is the neck, presenting a ligature mark. Bottom left of photo is the victim’s right, upper chest area).

 

 

 

 

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