PostHeaderIcon Joe Bonsall: A Memorial Day Tribute

“It has been my highest honor to have been able to remember my parents in a song and in a book. So many lived that same experience. The Greatest Generation is now leaving us, but we should NEVER forget the price they paid for FREEDOM…. God bless them every one!!!!” ~ Joe Bonsall

PostHeaderIcon Perpetrator v. Percolator: What’s In Your Dialog?

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Police jargon and slang is truly a language of its own, and it’s a body of words that can vary greatly from one area of the country to another.

If a writer’s goal is realism, I strongly urge the storyteller to do a little homework to avoid dialogue and terminology that doesn’t ring true, especially within a specific location or agency. A quick phone call to a police department’s public affairs office will normally provide you with the necessary information.

I’ve had the opportunity to speak with police officers all across the country about this very topic. Athough, my focus was on the use of three specific terms/words—Perp, Vic, and Juvie.

Here’s what I learned.

1) Perp – Not many police officers use the shortened form of the word perpetrator. Instead, they use the more common terms, suspect, actor, or ***hole. Listen to police scanners and you’ll rarely, if ever, hear an officer say, “We apprehended the perp at 0100 hours.” Typically, it’s, “We apprehended the suspect at 0100 hours.”

Perp is generally a specific, regional term.

FYI – the term perpetrator is NOT to be confused with the closely-sounding “percolator.” Confusing the two could prove to be quite embarrassing.

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Yes, I once saw the perpetrator/percolator faux pas in a manuscript.

By the way, you’ll probably not hear the other, more colorful term “a**hole” used on the police radio. It and other profanity are not supposed to be spoken on the air, but when the adrenaline is high and the bullets are flying, well, you just might hear anything.

2) Vic – This is another one I’ve seen in books countless times. Again, not all cops use Vic, if any, when referring to the victim of a crime. Well, TV cops do, but not all real-life cops. Actually, some real-life cops refer to their police cars as a Vic, if they’re driving a Ford Crown Victoria.

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To hear a fictional officer misuse the term can be a bit humorous. And, when a reader is thinking one thing but reading another…like, “I really put the Vic to the test. Put my foot in it and drove it hard, up the mountain and back down. Didn’t let up for a minute. I finally backed off when she started to spit and sputter. Overall, it was a good ride.”

It’s probably a great idea to provide a lead-in so readers will know your hero is referring to a car, not the unfortunate murder victim from chapter three. Ouch!

What word do cops use when referring to a victim? That’s an easy one—victim! Or…dead guy, DB (dead body), maggot snack, etc.

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3) Juvie – This is a nickname given to a place of detention for juvenile offenders, or as a generic word for kids.

Again, not all members of law enforcement use this term.

Most simply say “juvenile” to describe those innocent little darlins’ who are always on their best behavior.

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*By the way, I posted the following photo to my Facebook page last night. It’s a clue that could help solve a puzzle. Anyone have any ideas?

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